Mental Health

Issues: Mental Health

A high percentage of kids involved with the juvenile justice system have diagnosed mental illness and/or are survivors of trauma. They need access to effective services within the system – or better still before they ever come in contact with it.

Resources

Earlier=Better: Communities Proactively Addressing Children’s Mental Health

Keep the Promises Children’s Committee reviews successful programs and the need to scale them up. PDF, 956 KB

School-Based Diversion Initiative Toolkit

The SBDI Toolkit is a free resource for schools to help them manage behavioral issues and connect children to school and community-based mental health services using Connecticut’s local Emergency Mobile Psychiatric Services (EMPS) teams. Schools addressing mental health concerns often see a decrease in student arrests, suspensions, expulsions and bullying, as well as an improvement in academic achievement, school climate and school safety. WEBSITE

The Overlap Between Juvenile Justice and Mental Health in Connecticut: Healing the Generations

A PowerPoint presentation about children in Connecticut’s juvenile justice system, presented by CTJJA Executive Director Abby Anderson on October 3, 2013. POWERPOINT

Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Youth in Contact With the Juvenile Justice System in System of Care Communities

This National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice report provides an overview of the challenges many system of care communities face in working with children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system and provides examples of how some communities have overcome these challenges. PDF, 537 KB

Successfully Collaborating With the Juvenile Justice System: Benefits, Challenges, and Key Strategies

This National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice report takes a closer look at the importance of true collaboration between community-based child-serving agencies in providing a comprehensive array of services and supports and fostering positive outcomes for children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system. PDF, 406 KB

Systems of Care Programs That Serve Youth Involved With the Juvenile Justice System: Funding and Sustainability

This National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice report explores ways in which communities can financially sustain the efforts they have in place to meet the needs of children, youth, and young adults involved or at risk of involvement with the juvenile justice system after the SAMHSA funding period has ended. PDF, 459 KB

Why Investing in Trauma-Informed
Care for Children Makes Sense

This Justice Policy Institute report discusses the ramifications of trauma on youth and its impact on youth involvement in both the juvenile and criminal justice systems. The publication describes the causes of trauma and how it affects brain development in children. The report gives recommendations on effectively supporting youth afflicted by traumatic events. PDF, 201.9 KB

Emily J. Settlement Agreement (June 3, 2005)

This settlement will provide $8.5 million to help pay for new foster homes, group homes, intense home-based counseling and substance abuse treatment for hundreds of youths, starting in Hartford and expanding statewide in 2006. PDF, 118.46 KB

Overview of Evidence-based Practices for Youth in Connecticut

Bob Frank gave this Powerpoint presentation to the Judiciary, Childrens, and Appropriations committees on March 9, 2007 for Educate the Legislature Day. PowerPoint, 1.86 MB

What are the Implications of Adolescent
Brain Development on Juvenile Justice?

Coalition for Juvenile Justice Emerging Concepts Brief. A presentation of research findings intended to inform and improve juvenile justice and delinquency prevention policy and practice. PDF, 697.57 KB

In the News

Bazelon Center Backs Evidence-Based Alternatives to Increased Law Enforcement in Our Nation’s Schools

Bazelon Center release, March 28, 2013.WEBSITE

Action

Sign our petition

Learn what programs in your community are preventing kids from entering the juvenile justice system and support them.

Let policymakers know that you want your tax dollars spent on programs that work.